Event Date(s):
  Wednesday March 13, 2013 at 2:00pm

Penn News: Vijay Kumar of Engineering will give a webinar for the professional society ASME on the challenges and opportunities of designing aerial robots.

Register and More info here...

Event Date(s):
  Tuesday March 30, 2010 at 5:00pm

I

Thursday May 14, 2015

Penn Researchers Join Two NSF Projects on Medical Cyber-physical Systems

Media Contact:Evan Lerner | elerner@upenn.edu | 215-573-6604May 14, 2015

Presenter: Ryan Farrell (Homepage)

Event Dates:
  Wednesday May 20, 2015 from 2:00pm to 3:00pm

* Alternate Location: Levine 512*

While humans can readily identify basic-level categories such as table, turtle, or trumpet, recognition of subordinate-level categories within a domain (e.g.

Presenter's Biography:

Ryan Farrell is an Assistant Professor in the Computer Science department at Brigham Young University (BYU). He previously worked as a research scientist at the International Computer Science Institute (ICSI), a non-profit research institute affiliated with UC Berkeley, having completed his master's and doctorate degrees at the University of Maryland, College Park.

Presenter: Volkan Isler (Homepage)

Event Dates:
  Friday May 15, 2015 from 11:00am to 12:00pm

* Alternate Location: Levine 307*

In this talk, I will present an overview of our efforts on developing robotic systems for data collection in environmental and agricultural applications. I will introduce novel data gathering problems and show how they can be formulated as variants of TSP with Neighborhoods. Next, I will present approximation algorithms we have developed for these problems and conclude with results from field experiments.


Presenter's Biography:

Volkan Isler (CIS/GRASP'04) is an Associate Professor at the University of Minnesota. His research interests are in robotics, sensing and geometric algorithms.

Presenter: Sze Zheng Yong (Homepage)

Event Dates:
  Thursday May 21, 2015 from 12:00pm to 1:00pm

* Alternate Location: Levine 307*

Hybrid systems are a modeling framework that allows for the combined consideration of continuous and discrete state dynamics. They are described by a finite collection of continuous systems, with each of these continuous dynamics corresponding to discrete modes of operation. Hidden mode hybrid systems are the special case when the mode is unknown or hidden and mode transitions are autonomous (i.e., there is no direct control over the switching process).

Presenter's Biography:

Sze Zheng Yong received the Diplom-Ingenieur (FH) degree in Automotive Engineering from Esslingen University of Applied Sciences, Esslingen, Germany in 2008. He is currently a Ph.D. candidate in the Department of Mechanical Engineering at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT); he is associated with the Laboratory for Information and Decision Systems. His main research interests are in the areas of control and estimation of cyber-physical systems and autonomous systems, with an emphasis on security and robustness as well as the modeling framework of hybrid systems with hidden modes.

Presenter: Yannis Avrithis (Homepage)

Event Dates:
  Monday June 15, 2015 from 11:00am to 12:00pm

* Alternate Location: Levine 307*

In this talk we present a panoramic view of the geometry underpinning a number of vision problems, ranging from early vision to unsupervised mining in large image collections and beyond. Interplaying between continuous and discrete representations, geometry appears in different forms of duality, embeddings, and manifolds. We begin with planar shape decomposition as studied in psychophysics to model either occlusion or parts of recognition.

Presenter's Biography:

Dr. Yannis Avrithis is a senior researcher at the Image, Video and Multimedia Systems Laboratory (IVML) of the National Technical University of Athens (NTUA), carrying out research on image and video analysis, computer vision and machine learning, and teaching in NTUA. His research interests include visual feature detection, representation of visual appearance and geometry, image matching and registration, image indexing and retrieval, clustering, nearest neighbor search, object detection and recognition, scene classification, image/video segmentation and tracking, and video summarization. He has been involved in 15 European and 9 National research projects, he has co-supervised 8 Ph.D. theses and 12 Diploma theses, and he has published 3 theses, 3 edited volumes, 24 articles in journals, 97 in conferences and workshops, 8 book chapters and 7 technical reports in the above fields. He has contributed to the organization of 19 conferences and workshops, and is a reviewer in 15 scientific journals and 15 conferences.

Presenter: Martin Adams (Homepage)

Event Dates:
  Friday May 22, 2015 from 11:00am to 12:00pm

Applications for autonomous robots have long been identified in challenging environments including built-up areas, mines, disaster scenes, underwater and in the air. Robust solutions to autonomous navigation remain a key enabling issue behind any realistic success in these areas. Arguably, the most successful robot navigation algorithms to-date, have been derived from a probabilistic perspective, which takes into account vehicle motion and terrain uncertainty as well as sensor noise.

Presenter's Biography:

Martin Adams is Professor of Electrical Engineering at the Dept. of Electrical Engineering, University of Chile. He is also a principle investigator in the industrially sponsored Advanced Mining Technology Centre (AMTC). He obtained his first degree in Engineering Science at the University of Oxford, U.K, in 1988 and continued to study for a D.Phil. at the Robotics Research Group, University of Oxford, which he received in 1992. He continued his research in autonomous robot navigation as a project leader and part time lecturer at the Institute of Robotics, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (ETH), Zurich, Switzerland. He was employed as a Guest Professor and taught control theory in St. Gallen (Switzerland) from 1994 to 1995. From 1996 to 2000, he served as a senior research scientist in robotics and control, in the field of semiconductor assembly automation, at the European Semiconductor Equipment Centre (ESEC), Switzerland. From 2000 to 2010, he was Associate Professor at the School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Nanyang Technological University (NTU), Singapore. His research work focuses on autonomous robot navigation, sensing, sensor data interpretation and control, and more recently in the application of Random Finite Sets (RFS) and Finite Set Statistics (FISST) in Simultaneous Localization and Mapping (SLAM) and various target tracking problems. He has published many technical papers in these fields. He has been the principle investigator and leader of many robotics and industrially sponsored projects, coordinating researchers from local industries and local and overseas universities and has served as associate editor on various journal and conference editorial boards.

Thursday April 16, 2015

University of Pennsylvania Unleashes Robot Jerboa Upon the World