Event Date(s):
  Wednesday March 13, 2013 at 2:00pm

Penn News: Vijay Kumar of Engineering will give a webinar for the professional society ASME on the challenges and opportunities of designing aerial robots.

Register and More info here...

Event Date(s):
  Tuesday March 30, 2010 at 5:00pm

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Presenter: Dylan Shell (Homepage)

Event Dates:
  Thursday April 2, 2015 from 3:00pm to 4:00pm

* Alternate Location: 152 Curtis Hall, MEM Seminar Room*

In this talk I will describe recent research toward the goal of engineering multi-robot systems to form networks of efficient, cooperative, taskable agents. I shall consider variations of the multi-robot task allocation (assignment) problem, wherein one aims at finding the best matching between a set of robots and a set of tasks so that the team’s performance will be optimized. The assignment problem is one of the most popular formulations for optimizing the group synergy, and has a long history including work in Operations Research and AI communities.

Presenter's Biography:

Dylan Shell currently lives---like Schrödinger's cat---in a superposition of states: being an assistant/associate professor of Computer Science and Engineering at Texas A&M University. He is a computer scientist, having received degrees in computational & applied mathematics and computer science (from the University of the Witwatersrand, South Africa), and his M.S. and Ph.D. in Computer Science from the University of Southern California. His research aims to synthesize and analyze complex, intelligent behavior in distributed systems that exploit their physical embedding to interact with the physical world.

He has published papers on multi-robot task allocation, robotics for emergency scenarios, biologically inspired multiple robot systems, multi-robot routing, estimation of group-level swarm properties, minimalist manipulation, rigid-body simulation and contact models, human-robot interaction, and robotic theatre. His work has been funded by DARPA and the NSF; and he has been the recipient of the Montague Teaching award, the George Beckey Service award, and the NSF Career.

Presenter: Luca Carlone (Homepage)

Event Dates:
  Thursday April 9, 2015 from 11:00am to 12:00pm

* Alternate Location: Levine 307*

In many application fields (robotics, computer vision, sensor networks, etc.) we find inference problems in which the variables live on the edge of a graph that has a spatial embedding. Often the variables to be estimated are elements of Lie groups, and the available measurements are relative measurements corresponding to the edges of the graph.

Presenter's Biography:

Luca Carlone is a postdoctoral fellow at the College of Computing, at Georgia Tech. He was a visiting researcher at the University of California Santa Barbara (2011) and at the University of Zaragoza (2010). He received his M.Sc. degrees (summa cum laude) in Mechatronic Engineering from Politecnico di Torino, and in Automation Engineering from Politecnico di Milano in 2008, and a Ph.D. from Politecnico di Torino in 2012. He is broadly interested in robotic perception, estimation over graphs, and numerical optimization.

Presenter: Sangbae Kim (Homepage)

Event Dates:
  Friday March 20, 2015 from 9:30am to 10:30am

* Alternate Location: Towne 337*

Realizing animals’ magnificent dynamic movements in robots is next big challenge in many future robot applications. In contrast to manufacturing as a main task for conventional robots, mobile robots' tasks including disaster response often involve exploring unexpected areas and performing physical work in dangerous environments. The process of  ‘principle extraction’ from biology is a critical step toward the practical adoptation of nature's design.

Presenter's Biography:

Prof. Sangbae Kim, is the director of the Biomimetic Robotics Laboratory and an Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering at MIT. His research focuses on the bio-inspired robotic platform design by extracting principles from complex biological systems. Kim’s achievements on bio-inspired robot development include the world‘s first directional adhesive inspired from gecko lizards, and a climbing robot, Stickybot, that utilizes the directional adhesives to climb smooth surfaces featured in TIME’s best inventions in 2006. The MIT Cheetah achieves stable outdoor running at an efficiency of animals, employing biomechanical principles from studies of best runners in nature. This achievement was covered by more than 200 articles. He is a recipient of King-Sun Fu Memorial Best Transactions on Robotics Paper Award (2008), DARPA YFA(2013), and NSF CAREER (2014) award.

Tuesday March 3, 2015

 

Tuesday March 3, 2015

Vijay Kumar Named Dean of Penn Engineering

Media Contact:Ron Ozio | ozio@upenn.edu | 215-898-8658March 3, 2015

Vijay Kumar has been named dean of the University of Pennsylvania School of E

Tuesday February 24, 2015


This page can be viewed online at:  http://www.upenn.edu/almanac/volumes/v61/n24/honors-other-things.html#lee

Honors & Other Things

Friday January 23, 2015

 

Presenter: David Balduzzi (Homepage)

Event Dates:
  Thursday January 22, 2015 from 10:30am to 11:30am

* Alternate Location: Levine 307*

The main problem of distributed learning is credit assignment, which was solved in the 80s with the invention of error backpropagation. 30 years later, Backprop, along with a few more recent tricks, is the major workhorse underlying machine learning and remains state-of-the-art for supervised learning. However, weight updates under Backprop depend on recursive computations that require distinct output and error signals -- features not shared by biological neurons, that are perhaps unnecessary.


Presenter's Biography:

David Balduzzi is a Senior Lecturer in Mathematics and Statistics at Victoria University Wellington. He received a PhD in algebraic geometry from the University of Chicago, after which he worked on computational neuroscience at UW-Madison and machine learning at the Max Planck Institute for Intelligent Systems and ETH Zürich.