Spring 2011 GRASP Seminar - Chris Bregler, New York University, "From Eye-Balls to Ball-Games: Next-Gen Motion Capture for Science and Entertainment"

Abstract: This talk will cover several research projects centered around the use of vision and motion capture for animation, recognition, and gaming. This includes human movements as diverse as subtle eye-blinks, lip-motions, spine-deformations, human walks and dances, politicians, base-ball pitchers, and online and offline crowd games. The technical content of the talk focuses on the trade-off between data-driven and crowd-sourced models of human motion vs. analytically derived and perceptually driven models using dancers, animators, linguists, and other domain experts. This is demonstrated by sub-pixel tracking in Hollywood productions, reading the body-language of public figures, visualizing the pitches of NY Yankees Mariano Rivera, and the making of mocap games in various cultures.

Presenter's biography

Chris Bregler is an Associate Professor of Computer Science at NYU's Courant Institute. He received his M.S. and Ph.D. in Computer Science from U.C. Berkeley in 1995 and 1998 and his Diplom from Karlsruhe University in 1993. Prior to NYU he was on the faculty at Stanford University and worked for several companies including Hewlett Packard, Interval, Disney Feature Animation, and LucasFilm's ILM. He was named Stanford Joyce Faculty Fellow and Terman Fellow in 1999. He received the Olympus Prize for achievements in computer vision and AI in 2002, and was named a Sloan Research Fellow in 2003. He was the chair for the SIGGRAPH 2004 Electronic Theater and Computer Animation Festival. At CVPR 2008 he was awarded the IEEE Longuet-Higgins Prize for "Fundamental Contributions in Computer Vision that have withstood the test of time". He holds a few motion capture world records (according to The Motion Capture Society).